STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (SOP)

 

Title

 

Responsible Organization:

Document No.  XYZ 999 A11111.001

Page 1 of 

Approved by: Name, Title

Approvad Date: 31-Jan-2016 

Version Date: V1

31-Jan-2016 

Other Info 

DEPARTMENT "Title" POLICIES:

  • Insert Department policy statements (or links to policy documents)

  • All S.O.P. documents should include these Department Policy statements or links

 

S.O.P. Contents (Guide) 

 

1.0 PURPOSE

 

1.1 (What is the reason for writing this work instruction) Start with the following statement: “The
purpose of this document is to provide instructions for (fill this in).”

 

1.2 Be specific and define the purpose of the document.

 

2.0 SCOPE

 

2.1 (Define the area or process that this instruction applies to)

 

3.0 RECORDS

 

3.1 (Indicate specific type of records to be maintained and where they will be maintained)

 

4.0 ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS

 

4.1 (Reference the procedures that the work instruction is controlled by and reference any forms by control number used to create records. Also, reference other documents,
standards or information that are relevant.)

 

5.0 DEFINITIONS

 

5.1 (Define any terms and phrases that might be unique to this instruction)

 

6.0 RESPONSIBILITY

 

6.1 (List department(s), teams or work units responsible for maintaining these instructions)

 

7.0 TOOLS, GAGES, FIXTURES

 

7.1 (List all unique tools, gages, fixtures or other similar items required to perform the work instruction tasks.

 

8.0 SAFETY REQUIREMENTS

 

8.1 (List all necessary safety precautions that employees must comply with and all safety equipment that must be used while following the operations specified in this work instruction)

WORK INSTRUCTIONS
 
9.0 WORK INSTRUCTIONS

List each and all steps to complete this work instruction, in the exact sequence necessary. Work instructions may include process charts (see example in the box below) flowcharts, bullet instructions, text, photos, digitized images, numbered instructions, software instructions or any combination of all as long as they are complete and accurate.

 

9.1 through 9."n" - (Input each and every work instruction step).

S.O.P. Work Instructions Process Chart (example attachment to a Purchasing S.O.P.)

About S.O.P. Work Instructions Process Chart - A "best practice" to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of S.O.P. Work Instructions is to input the S.O.P. Work Instructions steps into a Process Chart like this example. The ACI-Process Designer tool may be used for this purpose.

 

Process Charts have certain advantages over flowcharts, including:

  • They provide process time (Pt) - the time estimated to accomplish the work instruction step;

  • They provide wait time (Pt) - the time estimated waiting after one step is completed until the next step begins (Note: Wt is often much longer than Pt); 

  • They provide non-value time (Nva) - the estimated time spent doing something that adds no value or progress to completing the work instructions (Note: Nva is something that a customer would not want to pay for, or experience (like waiting at the doctor's office)

  • The Process Chart calculates cycle time (Ct = Pt+ Wt + Nva) estimated to complete all steps in the work instructions. 

  • The Process Chart can provide an estimate of Pt cost for the process, using inputs of labor hours, labor rates (per hour) and non-labor costs (material, travel, other non-labor costs).

 

Note: The goal is to study the process chart values for Pt, Wt and Nva and make sure they are reasonably accurate - then begin brainstorming sessions with the performers of the work instructions, to find ways to reduce or eliminate Nva - then Wt - then Pt estimated times and costs.

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